Biospeleology Photographs

Biospeleology is the study of cave biology and its many aspects, such as ecology, taxonomy, biogeography, genetics, evolution, behavior, microbiology, environmental studies, and others.

Scientists classify animals and insects found in caves according to how much of their life-cycles they spend in the total darkness of a cave or other underground environments.

  • A trogloxene uses caves as shelter or food sources, but does not live in them all the time (e.g. bats).
  • A troglobite lives entirely within the cave environment and has adapted to it, with long legs or feelers, no or underdeveloped eyes, and a lack of pigment, making some of them look almost transparent.
  • A troglophile lives completely within a cave, but can also survive above ground because it usually maintains some of its vision and partial pigmentation.
  • Stygofauna live in groundwater systems or aquifers.
Amblypigid
Amblypigid
Blind Catfish
Blind Catfish
Blind Salamander
Blind Salamander
Cave spider with babies  Photo by Jean Krejca Taken in Coahuila
Cave spider with babies, taken in Coahuila
| Photo by Jean Krejca
Scolopendra heros  Photo by Jim Kennedy
Scolopendra heros | Photo by Jim Kennedy
Millipede
Millipede
Salamander in Davis Pit, AR -  Photo Carl Kunath
Salamander in Davis Pit, AR
| Photo: Carl Kunath
Some type of Stygobromus
some type of Stygobromus
Eurycea
Eurycea
eurycea tonkawe  Photo Jean Krecjea
Eurycea tonkawe
| Photo: Jean Krecjea
Indiana bats, Myotis sodalis.  Photo by Merlin Tuttle
Indiana bats, Myotis sodalis
| Photo by Merlin Tuttle
Tri-colored bat, Perimyotis subflavus, Photo Jim Kennedy
Tri-colored bat, Perimyotis subflavus
| Photo: Jim Kennedy
Texoreddellia sp., a cave silverfish, (family Nicoletiidae).  Photo by Jean Krecja
Texoreddellia sp., a cave silverfish,
(family Nicoletiidae) | Photo: Jean Krecja
A Darkling beetle (family Tenebrionidae) from a Texas cave. 
 Photo by Jean Krejca
A Darkling beetle (family Tenebrionidae)
from a Texas cave | Photo: Jean Krejca
Spider in a Mexican Cave photo by Jean Krejca
Spider in a Mexican Cave |
Photo: Jean Krejca
Photo by Jean Krejca - Cicurina Species
Circurina sp. | Photo: Jean Krejca
Eleutherodactylus marnockii, the cliff chirping frog, 
common in Texas cave  Photo by Jim Kennedy
Eleutherodactylus marnockii, the cliff chirping frog,
common in Texas caves
| Photo: Jim Kennedy
skeleton of  Tadarida brasiliensis bat photo by Jim Kennedy
skeleton of Tadarida brasiliensis bat:
| Photo: Jim Kennedy
Corynorhinus townsendiii, from Fern Cave in Val Verde County. 
 Photo by Jim Kennedy
Corynorhinus townsendiii,
from Fern Cave in Val Verde County
| Photo: Jim Kennedy
scorpion (Pseudouroctonus reddelli) from Stuart Bat Cave
 photo by Allan Cobb
scorpion (Pseudouroctonus reddelli)
from Stuart Bat Cave
| Photo: Allan Cobb
baby black vultures (Coragyps atratus) on a nest in
 Crichfield Bat Cave, photo by Jim Kennedy
baby black vultures (Coragyps atratus)
on a nest in Crichfield Bat Cave
| Photo: Jim Kennedy
a tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum)
 from Tiger Cave in Culberson County by Jim Kennedy
tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum)
from Tiger Cave in Culberson County
| Photo: Jim Kennedy
pair of tiny Neoleptoneta sp. spiders from Fawcetts Cave,  photo
by Joel Ledford
pair of tiny Neoleptoneta sp. spiders
from Fawcetts Cave
| Photo: Joel Ledford
Chinquipellobunus harvestman, 
photo by Jean Krejca
Stygnopsis harvestman
| Photo: Jean Krejca